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I did my 3rd year's internship at Champ d'Action, a Belgian ensemble for modern music.

They were working on a project called "Power Flower" and I was hired as an intern to make visuals for the performance.

The performance was in spirit of the sixties, with avant-garde music from that time.

It had already been decided that the visuals would run on as much as possible old tv's (CRT's). I tracked down a lot of TV's via eBay and other online marketplaces and eventually we were able to get about 45 working TV's, color and black and white.

These TV's all had standard cable connections, so we (the visual guys, Kurt Van Houtte and me) worked with a VGA to Composite converter followed by a Composite to cable signal converter. There were two of these circuits. We also had a couple of live feeds from video cameras coming in through a makeshift composite videomixer.

Add to this the changing of cables through the performance, and we had about 6 video sources which we could put on either TV loop or the large overhead projector.

We worked with a mixture of techniques. I had built a software video mixer in Max 5 (which back then had just come out) which I used to trigger the different video's at the right time. I had it running on a PowerMac G5 (in max 4.5) and on my Toshiba laptop (in Max 5). Kurt had two laptops running his custom Processing sketches and sometimes fullscreen quicktime video.

We were standing next to all the musicians on stage. This way we could have full control over TV's and sometimes interact with them, playing with the noise, turning them on and off. We also controlled the lightmixer.

Overall, it was a big mess of wires.

The performance began with a tape track recording of William's Mix by John Cage. This 8-track recording was sent out to 8 speakers surrounding the audience. At the same time a video would run on the projector. This video (you can see the flash video here) was generated using Processing from an algorithm of several noise functions.

This internship had turned out to be very fun and a valuable experience.

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